Have researchers found the cause of ALS?

SUNDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) The apparent discovery of a common cause of all forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could give a boost to efforts to find a treatment for the fatal neurodegenerative disease, a new study contends.

Scientists have long struggled to identify the underlying disease process of ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) and weren’t even sure that a common disease process was associated with all forms of ALS.

In this new study, Northwestern University researchers said they found that the basis of ALS is a malfunctioning protein recycling system in the neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Efficient recycling of the protein building blocks in the neurons are critical for optimal functioning of the neurons. They become severely damaged when they can’t repair or maintain themselves.

This problem occurs in all three types of ALS: hereditary, sporadic and ALS that targets the brain, the researchers said.

The discovery, published Aug. 21 in the journal Nature, shows that, all forms of ALS share an underlying cause and offers a common target for drug therapy, according to the researchers.

“This opens up a whole new field for finding an effective treatment for ALS,” study senior author Dr. Teepu Siddique, of the Davee Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said in a university news release. “We can now test for drugs that would regulate this protein pathway or optimize it, so it functions as it should in a normal state.”

This finding about the breakdown of protein recycling in ALS may also prove useful in the study of other neurodegenerative diseases, specifically Alzheimer’s and other dementias, the Northwestern researchers said.

ALS afflicts an estimated 350,000 people around the world. About 50 percent of patients die within three years of the first symptoms. They progressively lose muscle strength until they’re paralyzed and can’t move, speak, swallow and breathe, the researchers said.

For more information: ALS Association.

***************

I have written about ALS before. My step-father suffered with ALS for over 10 years. That is almost unheard of. He lost his battle with the disease on July 4, 2011. To read more about how this disease affected our family you can go here and here. These findings are very exciting. I pray that better research will some day result in better treatment and a cure.

Advertisements
Categories: Life | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a reply, but please be kind. Name calling or profanity will not be allowed.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: